#DailyInspiration | 8 TED Talks on how to be great leader.

#DailyInspiration | 8 TED Talks on how to be great leader.

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1. Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action –
Fascinated by the leaders who make impact in the world, companies and politicians with the capacity to inspire, Simon Sinek has discovered some remarkable patterns in how they think, act and communicate. He wrote Start With Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action to explore his idea of the Golden Circle, what he calls “a naturally occurring pattern, grounded in the biology of human decision making, that explains why we are inspired by some people, leaders, messages and organizations over others.”

In this talk, Simon Sinek explores how leaders can inspire cooperation, trust and change.

2. Fields Wicker-Miurin: Learning from leadership’s missing manual –
Leadership doesn’t have a user’s manual, but Fields Wicker-Miurin says stories of remarkable, local leaders are the next best thing. At a TED salon in London, she shares three.

Fields Wicker-Miurin is co-founder of Leaders’ Quest, an organization that brings together leaders from around the world to learn about key trends in their regions, and to explore their role as leaders. Through regional “Quests,” leaders learn how their efforts are interconnected and have the potential to improve the world at the global level, too. Leaders’ Quest is cross-cultural, interdisciplinary, and multi-generational.

3. Itay Talgam: Lead like the great conductors –
After a decade-long conducting career in his native Israel, Itay Talgam has reinvented himself as a “conductor of people” — in government, academia, business and education. He is the author of The Ignorant Maestro.

Itay Talgam finds metaphors for organizational behavior — and models for inspired leadership — within the workings of the symphony orchestra. Imagining music as a model for all spheres of human creativity, from the classroom to the boardroom, Talgam created the Maestro Leadership Program.

Talgam’s workshops aim to help everyday people develop a musician’s sense of collaboration, and a conductor’s sense of leadership: that inner sense of being intuitively, even subconsciously, connected to your fellow players, giving what they need and getting what you need. It’s this art of listening and reacting in the moment that makes for a swinging jazz combo, a sublime string quartet, a brilliant orchestra — and great teams at work.

4. Drew Dudley: Everyday leadership –
We have all changed someone’s life — usually without even realizing it. In this funny talk, Drew Dudley calls on all of us to celebrate leadership as the everyday act of improving each other’s lives. He believes leadership is not a characteristic reserved for the extraordinary. He works to help people discover the leader within themselves.

Drew Dudley’s interest in developing people’s leadership began when he was the Leadership Development coordinator at the University of Toronto, Scarborough. In 2010 he founded Nuance Leadership Development Services, a company that creates leadership curricula for communities, organizations and individuals — a subject on which he also speaks widely.

5. Roselinde Torres: What it takes to be a great leader –
The world is full of leadership programs, but the best way to learn how to lead might be right under your nose. In this clear, candid talk, Roselinde Torres describes 25 years observing truly great leaders at work, and shares the three simple but crucial questions would-be company chiefs need to ask to thrive in the future.

BCG’s Roselinde Torres studies what makes great leaders tick — and figures out how to teach others the same skills.
Roselinde Torres is a senior partner and managing director at the consulting firm, BCG. A senior leader in the firm’s “people and organization” practice area, she is also the company’s resident expert on leadership, a topic she has studied her entire career.

Questions she likes to ask include, “what innovative methods can help prepare the next generation of leaders?” and “how do we enable leaders to unlearn past modes and habits of success?”

6. Tim Harford: Trial, error and the God complex –
Economics writer Tim Harford studies complex systems — and finds a surprising link among the successful ones: they were built through trial and error. In this sparkling talk from TEDGlobal 2011, he asks us to embrace our randomness and start making better mistakes.

Tim Harford’s writings reveal the economic ideas behind everyday experiences.
In the Undercover Economist column he writes for the Financial Times, Tim Harford looks at familiar situations in unfamiliar ways and explains the fundamental principles of the modern economy. He illuminates them with clear writing and a variety of examples borrowed from daily life.

His book, Adapt: Why Success Always Starts With Failure, argues that the world has become far too unpredictable and complex for today’s challenges to be tackled with ready-made solutions and expert opinions. Instead, Harford suggests, we need to learn to embrace failure and to constantly adapt, to improvise rather than plan, to work from the bottom up rather than the top down.



7. David Logan: Tribal leadership –

David Logan talks about the five kinds of tribes that humans naturally form — in schools, workplaces, even the driver’s license bureau. By understanding our shared tribal tendencies, we can help lead each other to become better individuals.

David Logan is a USC faculty member, best-selling author, and management consultant.
David Logan studies how people communicate within a company — and how to harness our natural gifts to make change within organizations. He looks at emerging patterns of corporate leadership, organizational transformation, generational differences in the workplace, and team building for high-potential managers and executives.

8. John Wooden: The difference between winning and succeeding –
With profound simplicity, Coach John Wooden redefines success and urges us all to pursue the best in ourselves. In this inspiring talk he shares the advice he gave his players at UCLA, quotes poetry and remembers his father’s wisdom.

John Wooden, affectionately known as Coach, led UCLA to record wins that are still unmatched in the world of basketball. Throughout his long life, he shared the values and life lessons he passed to his players, emphasizing success that’s about much more than winning.

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