#dailyinspiration | 10 TED Talks for people who love to eat!

#dailyinspiration | 10 TED Talks for people who love to eat!

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ed1d5e6de76df3b30321bd9ce80d3cda1. How I fell in love with a fish, Den Barber:
Chef Dan Barber squares off with a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu. With impeccable research and deadpan humor, he chronicles his pursuit of a sustainable fish he could love, and the foodie’s honeymoon he’s enjoyed since discovering an outrageously delicious fish raised using a revolutionary farming method in Spain.

About the speaker: Dan Barber is the chef at New York’s Blue Hill restaurant, and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in Westchester, where he practices a kind of close-to-the-land cooking married to agriculture and stewardship of the earth. In 2009, Barber received the James Beard award for America’s Outstanding Chef, and was named one of the world’s most influential people in Time’s annual “Time 100” list. In 2014 he published The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food.

2. The price of happinessBenjamin Wallace:
 Can happiness be bought? To find out, author Benjamin Wallace sampled the world’s most expensive products, including a bottle of 1947 Chateau Cheval Blanc, 8 ounces of Kobe beef and the fabled (notorious) Kopi Luwak coffee. His critique may surprise you.

About the speaker: Benjamin Wallace is a journalist and author of The Billionaire’s Vinegar, the true story of the world’s most expensive bottle of (possibly phony?) wine. He’s been a contributor to GQ, Details, Salon and The Washington Post.

3. Cooking as alchemyBen Roche, Homaro Cantu:
Homaro Cantu and Ben Roche come from Moto, a Chicago restaurant that plays with new ways to cook and eat food. But beyond the fun and flavor-tripping, there’s a serious intent: Can we use new food technology for good?

About the speakers: The executive chef at Chicago’s Moto restaurant, Homaro Cantu created postmodern cuisine and futuristic food delivery systems.
Ben Roche is the pastry chef at Moto, in Chicago, and was the co-host, with Homaro Cantu, of the TV show “Future Food.”

4. The art and craft of bread, Peter Reinhart:
Batch to batch, crust to crust … In tribute to the beloved staple food, baking master Peter Reinhart reflects on the cordial couplings (wheat and yeast, starch and heat) that give us our daily bread. Try not to eat a slice.

About the speaker: Master breadmaker Peter Reinhart is also a teacher, author and theologian. Through his lectures and numerous cookbooks, he channels the science of baking into deep, spiritual lessons — and dispels stale myths about the nature (and flavor) of good, wholesome bread.

5. Cooking as never seen before, Nathan Myhrvold:
Cookbook author (and geek) Nathan Myhrvold talks about his magisterial work, “Modernist Cuisine” — and shares the secret of its cool photographic illustrations, which show cross-sections of food in the very act of being cooked.

About the speaker: Nathan Myhrvold is a professional jack-of-all-trades. After leaving Microsoft in 1999, he’s been a world barbecue champion, a wildlife photographer, a chef, a contributor to SETI, and a volcano explorer.

6. What’s wrong with what we eat, Mark Bittman:
In this fiery and funny talk, New York Times food writer Mark Bittman weighs in on what’s wrong with the way we eat now (too much meat, too few plants; too much fast food, too little home cooking), and why it’s putting the entire planet at risk.

About the speaker: Mark Bittman is a bestselling cookbook author, journalist and television personality. His friendly, informal approach to home cooking has shown millions that fancy execution is no substitute for flavor and soul.

7. We need to feed the whole world, Louise Fresco:
Louise Fresco shows us why we should celebrate mass-produced, supermarket-style white bread. She says environmentally sound mass production will feed the world, yet leave a role for small bakeries and traditional methods.

About the speaker: A powerful thinker and globe-trotting advisor on sustainability, Louise Fresco says it’s time to think of food as a topic of social and economic importance on par with oil — that responsible agriculture and food consumption are crucial to world stability.

8. The killer American diet that’s sweeping the planet, Dean Ornish:
Forget the latest disease in the news: Cardiovascular disease kills more people than everything else combined — and it’s mostly preventable. Dr. Dean Ornish explains how changing our eating habits can save lives.

About the speaker: Dean Ornish is a clinical professor at UCSF and founder of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute. He’s a leading expert on fighting illness — particularly heart disease with dietary and lifestyle changes.

9. Save the oceans, feed the world! – Jackie Savitz:
What’s a marine biologist doing talking about world hunger? Well, says Jackie Savitz, fixing the world’s oceans might just help to feed the planet’s billion hungriest people. In an eye-opening talk, Savitz tells us what’s really going on in our global fisheries right now — it’s not good — and offers smart suggestions of how we can help them heal, while making more food for all.

Jackie Savitz works to protect the world’s oceans. A marine biologist, she is passionate that saving the seas will benefit us all.

10. What’s wrong with school lunches, Ann Cooper:
Speaking at the 2007 EG conference, “renegade lunch lady” Ann Cooper talks about the coming revolution in the way kids eat at school — local, sustainable, seasonal and even educational food.

About the speaker: Ann Cooper cares — a lot — what kids eat for lunch. As the head of nutrition for Berkeley, California, schools, she serves organic, regionally sourced and sustainable meals to lots of lucky children.

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